chead said:  hey what's up with the "!" in fandoms? i.e. "fat!<thing>" just curious thaxxx <3

nentuaby:

hosekisama:

michaelblume:

molly-ren:

stevita:

molly-ren:

molly-ren:

I have asked this myself in the past and never gotten an answer.

Maybe today will be the day we are both finally enlightened.

woodsgotweird said: man i just jumped on the bandwagon because i am a sheep. i have no idea where it came from and i ask myself this question all the time

Maybe someone made a typo and it just got out of hand?

I kinda feel like panic!at the disco started the whole exclamation point thing and then it caught on around the internet, but maybe they got it from somewhere else, IDK.

The world may never know…

Maybe it’s something mathematical?

I’ve been in fandom since *about* when Panic! formed and the adjective!character thing was already going strong, pretty sure it predates them.

It’s a way of referring to particular variations of (usually) a character — dark!Will, junkie!Sherlock, et cetera. I have suspected for a while that it originated from some archive system that didn’t accommodate spaces in its tags, so to make common interpretations/versions of the characters searchable, people started jamming the words together with an infix.

(Lately I’ve seen people use the ! notation when the suffix isn’t the full name, but is actually the second part of a common fandom portmanteau. This bothers me a lot but it happens, so it’s worth being aware of.)

"Bang paths" (! is called a "bang"when not used for emphasis) were the first addressing scheme for email, before modern automatic routing was set up. If you wanted to write a mail to the Steve here in Engineering, you just wrote "Steve" in the to: field and the computer sent it to the local account named Steve. But if it was Steve over in the physics department you wrote it to phys!Steve; the computer sent it to the "phys" computer, which sent it in turn to the Steve account. To get Steve in the Art department over at NYU, you wrote NYU!art!Steve- your computer sends it to the NYU gateway computer sends it to the "art" computer sends it to the Steve account. Etc. ("Bang"s were just chosen because they were on the keyboard, not too visually noisy, and not used for a huge lot already).

It became pretty standard jargon, as I understand, to disambiguate when writing to other humans. First phys!Steve vs the Steve right next to you, just like you were taking to the machine, then getting looser (as jargon does) to reference, say, bearded!Steve vs bald!Steve.

So I’m guessing alternate character version tags probably came from that.

6 days ago  +  11,940 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #awesome  #fandom  #fandom history  #language  #bang paths

basiacat:

when ur thirsty for fic but you have quite fucking literally read every single quality fanfiction for the pairing

1 week ago  +  64,291 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #fanfiction  #fandom

tofixtheshadows:

I think my favorite thing about the fandom culture on tumblr are the headcanon posts. They’re all revolutionary, because they almost invariably come from marginalized voices. We who have been unloved by the world imagine our favorite characters loving us, fighting for us. Where their creators expect us to exalt them through uncritical worship, we do it by humbling them instead. We make them better by making them one of us.

We racebend, or we explore and celebrate the cultural backgrounds of non-white characters whose ethnicities have been canonically overlooked. We reclaim them as queer or non-binary or neurotypical or disabled, and then we imagine them loving themselves and being loved by their communities. We take characters who have been broken in their battles and envision for them days of quiet happiness, of rest and healing and small comforts, because we’ve been there and we know exactly what you need. We turn them into the role models we should have, that we desperately need, and I think it helps us love ourselves more too. 

So don’t ever stop writing posts about Scott McCall hearing his mother sing lullabies in Spanish or Bucky Barnes helping kids get prosthetics or charity-starting bisexual Steve Rogers who stands up for women’s rights or Hogwarts houses validating their trans students. Give me all your fan art of fat Feferi and hijabi Rose Lalonde and the Avengers in a big cuddle pile of mutual self care. This is so important, don’t let anybody tell you differently. I appreciate it all so much.

1 week ago  +  8,014 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #yes good so good  #meta meta  #fandom

tonystarks:

don’t trash talk the lady characters just because they’re makin’ out with the dude you want fuckin’ another dude. what the fuck is wrong with you.

1 week ago  +  15,550 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #fandom

goodluckdetective:

*knocks on your door*

Hello. I’ve heard you’ve been invalidating a male character’s past straight relationships in order to make your slash ship sale. 

Could I interest you on the subject of bisexuality.

It’s free! It’s friendly! It’s perfectly workable with canon! It stops misogynistic fic tropes in order to slash ship in it’s tracks.

Invest in bisexuality today!

Bonus: Buy today and receive a free addition of pansexuality for no extra fee!

1 week ago  +  28,582 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #THANK YOOUUUU  #fandom  #fanfiction  #quiltbag  #representation  #bi erasure

slammuraispirit:

when ur otp is destroying you but ur friend just doesn’t ship it

image

1 week ago  +  43,727 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #lmao oh my god  #fandom

silentstep:

relenafanel:

digivolvin:

pining is 100000% the most important aspect of pre-relationship fic for me. good-natured whole-hearted pining filled with lovelorn gazing and chest aching and fluttering touches, that’s my top priority. i was put on this earth to watch characters suffer over the profundity of their love for another person. unrequited love is why god made me. characters finding out that their feelings are reciprocated after long months/years of suffering is why the universe was assembled from nothingness. amen.

         (via drunktuesdaze)

#fanfic  #pining  #gpoy  #I don’t even have the words to describe what pining means to me  #and the only thing that’s anywhere near as good  #is pining without the hope of the feelings ever being requited  #give me ten thousand stories about quietly accepting love with no hope that it will ever be returned  #ten thousand stories about being happy and grateful to be close to someone even though it hurts  #ten thousand stories about knowing this is it; there’s never going to be anyone else who means more; and if that means being alone  #then so be it  #and then TEN THOUSAND STORIES ABOUT BEING WRONG  #TEN THOUSAND STORIES WHERE A WISH THAT SEEMED IMPOSSIBLY OUT OF REACH COMES TRUE  #GIVE ME ALL OF THE PINING AND ACCEPTANCE OF UNREQUITED LOVE  #ONLY TO HAVE ALL OF THOSE ASSUMPTIONS PROVED BEAUTIFULLY AND BLISSFULLY WRONG

2 weeks ago  +  19,305 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #IT  #GOT  #BETTER  #augh  #fanfiction  #fandom  #about me

digivolvin:

pining is 100000% the most important aspect of pre-relationship fic for me. good-natured whole-hearted pining filled with lovelorn gazing and chest aching and fluttering touches, that’s my top priority. i was put on this earth to watch characters suffer over the profundity of their love for another person. unrequited love is why god made me. characters finding out that their feelings are reciprocated after long months/years of suffering is why the universe was assembled from nothingness. amen.

2 weeks ago  +  19,305 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #this is the truest thing i've ever read  #fanfiction  #fandom

scifigrl47:

erindizmo:

optimisticstorm:

beaubete:

isthisrubble:

AO3 does not fuck around, people
This email is about the fic I posted at 9 o’clock last night, I woke up to it this morning
Further proof that AO3 cares about its readers and aren’t slow about telling its writers to toe the line
fanfiction.net would just delete the fic, wouldn’t they?

I kind of really don’t like this? I mean, how did you have it tagged before? Did you maybe just forget to tag it with Major Character Death?I’ve got a fic up in which James Bond is dead. Completely dead, blunt force trauma to the head and abandoned in the tube. He’s revived by Q when Q finds him because Q is a faerie living in the tunnels and he knows it will be more trouble than it’s worth to let Bond’s rotting corpse stink up the place, but when Bond comes to, he has distinct memories of things that should have led to death and wanders around wearing clothing streaked with his own gore.Now, granted, it’s a little bit vague that this is what’s happened—we find out that Bond has been killed only after he’s already been brought back, and Q is deliberately opaque about what happened, but still. In that fic, Bond’s death doesn’t deserve a warning, even though it happens. It’s not even a “choose not to warn” situation because his death is such a non-existent blip in the story that it almost isn’t important. Warning for death would put people off—it always does—and “choose not to warn” is typically as bad as actually warning for death. I can see if the death is a major part of the story and/or detailed/triggery there may be a need for a tag, but if not, I’m bothered by AO3 policing your work to the extent that they tell you they’re going to go into the settings and make changes to your work. I understand wanting to protect readers, but it’s inappropriate to threaten to make changes against your will that may affect how your work is perceived.

I feel like tags are starting to get a bit extreme. Not all the time, but sometimes. For example, I get annoyed with certain ones (especially the Major Character Death tag) because they give away what happens in the story. 
I feel like Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much. Books and TV don’t give trigger warnings, and no one makes a fuss about that - why is it such a big deal in fan fiction?

Well, like they say in the original e-mail, that’s what ‘Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings’ is for. If you don’t want to warn, you’re not by any means required to. But if you tag it ‘No Archive Warnings Apply’, then you’re spoiling (in a way) by outright stating that in that particular work there is no major character death, non-con, graphic violence, or underage sex. So if someone goes into one that is tagged with that, they are well within their rights to be upset and report the work (because it does violate the TOS which you agree to by posting).
A lot of Choose Not To Warn works don’t have any of the above either, but the creators just don’t want to disclose. And that’s cool. I personally use CNTW when in my opinion it’s borderline in my work as to whether the warning tag should be added or not.
And if someone really does not want to be spoiled for the content of the archive warnings, they can always set their preferences so the warning tags don’t show up! Everyone wins!

The “Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much” thing is something I’m seeing a lot of lately, and I don’t think you could be more wrong.
TV and movies DO have trigger warnings.  They’re the ratings, which are now fairly detailed.  Avengers, for example, carried a notation that it contained a ‘passing drug reference,’ for Tony’s ‘big bag of weed’ line.  That detailed.  I mean, that’s kind of detailed.  I saw it in the ratings info and laughed.
But here’s the thing.  The archive warnings are there to protect the readers.  While I’m sure that for the previous author, having a character bludgeoned to death wasn’t a big deal, it’s fine, he got better.
For readers, though, a sudden, violent attack that leads to a death, no matter how short a time he may be dead, is unexpected and possibly not something that reader is capable of dealing with at that moment.  For someone who has lost a friend or family member to violence of that nature, or who has THEMSELVES experienced that sort of traumatic attack, being blindsided by it when they are not expecting it can be absolutely horrible.  
So when the writer chooses not to put major trigger warnings on their works, they are putting the ‘surprise’ or ‘shock’ of their plot above the well-being of the reader.  If you think that warning for triggers will put people off of your fic?  It might.  But you know what really, really puts people off of your fic?  The feeling of betrayal that results in when someone thinks they have entered a safe space and find out that it is not.
Trigger Warnings are not an attempt at censorship.  It is not an attempt to make writers compromise their artistic integrity.  It is a way to provide information, so that readers can make an educated decision about what they, at that moment, are capable of handling.  For all the readers who don’t need them, I am so glad.
But I will tag, down to the smallest thing, for the one reader out of ten thousand who needs that tag desperately.  This is not about me, or my work.  It’s about making sure that I share it in a responsible manner, and as a writer and a reader, I’m very grateful for AO3 and its volunteer staff of moderators and tag wranglers.
For making sure we are all responsible.  This is our hobby.  This is our happy place.  I think that right to a safe space within fandom should be extended to every reader.

scifigrl47:

erindizmo:

optimisticstorm:

beaubete:

isthisrubble:

AO3 does not fuck around, people

This email is about the fic I posted at 9 o’clock last night, I woke up to it this morning

Further proof that AO3 cares about its readers and aren’t slow about telling its writers to toe the line

fanfiction.net would just delete the fic, wouldn’t they?

I kind of really don’t like this? I mean, how did you have it tagged before? Did you maybe just forget to tag it with Major Character Death?

I’ve got a fic up in which James Bond is dead. Completely dead, blunt force trauma to the head and abandoned in the tube. He’s revived by Q when Q finds him because Q is a faerie living in the tunnels and he knows it will be more trouble than it’s worth to let Bond’s rotting corpse stink up the place, but when Bond comes to, he has distinct memories of things that should have led to death and wanders around wearing clothing streaked with his own gore.

Now, granted, it’s a little bit vague that this is what’s happened—we find out that Bond has been killed only after he’s already been brought back, and Q is deliberately opaque about what happened, but still. In that fic, Bond’s death doesn’t deserve a warning, even though it happens. It’s not even a “choose not to warn” situation because his death is such a non-existent blip in the story that it almost isn’t important. Warning for death would put people off—it always does—and “choose not to warn” is typically as bad as actually warning for death. I can see if the death is a major part of the story and/or detailed/triggery there may be a need for a tag, but if not, I’m bothered by AO3 policing your work to the extent that they tell you they’re going to go into the settings and make changes to your work. I understand wanting to protect readers, but it’s inappropriate to threaten to make changes against your will that may affect how your work is perceived.

I feel like tags are starting to get a bit extreme. Not all the time, but sometimes. For example, I get annoyed with certain ones (especially the Major Character Death tag) because they give away what happens in the story. 

I feel like Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much. Books and TV don’t give trigger warnings, and no one makes a fuss about that - why is it such a big deal in fan fiction?

Well, like they say in the original e-mail, that’s what ‘Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings’ is for. If you don’t want to warn, you’re not by any means required to. But if you tag it ‘No Archive Warnings Apply’, then you’re spoiling (in a way) by outright stating that in that particular work there is no major character death, non-con, graphic violence, or underage sex. So if someone goes into one that is tagged with that, they are well within their rights to be upset and report the work (because it does violate the TOS which you agree to by posting).

A lot of Choose Not To Warn works don’t have any of the above either, but the creators just don’t want to disclose. And that’s cool. I personally use CNTW when in my opinion it’s borderline in my work as to whether the warning tag should be added or not.

And if someone really does not want to be spoiled for the content of the archive warnings, they can always set their preferences so the warning tags don’t show up! Everyone wins!

The “Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much” thing is something I’m seeing a lot of lately, and I don’t think you could be more wrong.

TV and movies DO have trigger warnings.  They’re the ratings, which are now fairly detailed.  Avengers, for example, carried a notation that it contained a ‘passing drug reference,’ for Tony’s ‘big bag of weed’ line.  That detailed.  I mean, that’s kind of detailed.  I saw it in the ratings info and laughed.

But here’s the thing.  The archive warnings are there to protect the readers.  While I’m sure that for the previous author, having a character bludgeoned to death wasn’t a big deal, it’s fine, he got better.

For readers, though, a sudden, violent attack that leads to a death, no matter how short a time he may be dead, is unexpected and possibly not something that reader is capable of dealing with at that moment.  For someone who has lost a friend or family member to violence of that nature, or who has THEMSELVES experienced that sort of traumatic attack, being blindsided by it when they are not expecting it can be absolutely horrible.  

So when the writer chooses not to put major trigger warnings on their works, they are putting the ‘surprise’ or ‘shock’ of their plot above the well-being of the reader.  If you think that warning for triggers will put people off of your fic?  It might.  But you know what really, really puts people off of your fic?  The feeling of betrayal that results in when someone thinks they have entered a safe space and find out that it is not.

Trigger Warnings are not an attempt at censorship.  It is not an attempt to make writers compromise their artistic integrity.  It is a way to provide information, so that readers can make an educated decision about what they, at that moment, are capable of handling.  For all the readers who don’t need them, I am so glad.

But I will tag, down to the smallest thing, for the one reader out of ten thousand who needs that tag desperately.  This is not about me, or my work.  It’s about making sure that I share it in a responsible manner, and as a writer and a reader, I’m very grateful for AO3 and its volunteer staff of moderators and tag wranglers.

For making sure we are all responsible.  This is our hobby.  This is our happy place.  I think that right to a safe space within fandom should be extended to every reader.

1 month ago  +  1,179 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #thank you  #trigger warnings  #fandom  #fanfiction

What was it like to be a female Star Trek fan in the 1960s? 

magnoliapearl:

seiya234:

phene-thyla-mine:

I found these reddit posts that I thought gave great insight into what it was like for women in the 1960s who enjoyed Star Trek.  Very eye-opening, in my opinion.  I hadn’t realized the extent to which women enjoying science fiction was frowned upon.  Source: X

[–]Aynielle 6 points 11 months ago:  I often wonder if our mothers pined away for members of the og star trek crew like this? William Shatner was a fine man, back in his day. http://www.culch.ie/images/Shatner001.jpg

[–]thecla 8 points 11 months ago:  Yes, we did. And we wrote fanfic, though there was no internet to share it on.

[–]Aynielle 2 points 11 months ago:  Was it just passed amongst friends? Or were there publications that featured them? Thanks for posting! I find this wildly interesting. :)

[–]thecla 5 points 11 months ago:  Ok, if you don’t mind a bit of a story…

I went to a private girls’ high school in the mid-late 60’s. I was already a geek, though that wasn’t a term we used. Anyway, I’d already watched the first season of ST by the time I got to school, and was freaking out a bit, ‘cause the dorms had only one TV per dorm; each dorm had about a hundred girls in it.

Star Trek was on Friday nights, so I figured there was no way I’d ever get to see it (it was not as popular at first as everyone seems to say it was). I found out, though, that the first person to sit by the TV after dinner got to say what would be watched! It wasn’t really as much of a race as you’d think, because before Star Trek came on, there was Wild, Wild West, and Robert Conrad with those very, very tight pants (Conrad)Everyone watched that! Actually, it wasn’t till I showed up that anyone bothered leaving the TV on after that.

I watched Star Trek alone for the first couple weeks, then a couple girls stayed with me, then more, and soon it was everybody settling in for two hours of quality coughcough TV.

By sophomore year we had it down to a science: who would make the popcorn, who would bring the drinks, and we would sit there with our hair wrapped around juice cans and coffee cans to get just the right amount of straight vs. curl, in our robes and bunny slippers to watch the best looking guys on TV run around, hopefully without shirts on.

Sophomore year brought us an additional student who was really good at writing. She could write phenomenal satires on whatever literature we were reading, and could translate them into Latin or Greek while she was doing it. Her stories always got passed around (remember, no computers, she wrote them out longhand, then typed them with two sheets of paper and a carbon in between. Some of the stories were a hundred pages or more.)

This girl did a full-length take-off on The Rape of The Lock by John Donne, (which is already a satire) that had us all in stitches, ended up being read by the staff (and it was about them…). We could hear the teachers laughing from rooms away!

Anyway, this is the girl that started writing the Star Trek fanfic. She wrote one for herself and asked me to proofread it (we were roommates), and I begged and begged for one about me till she finally gave in and wrote it. Then another girl found out, and another, and then someone else started writing them. And yes, they would make the rounds, so everybody got to read them all. All written longhand, then typed, collated, stapled, and hopefully treasured by the recipient. I wonder sometimes how many of them still exist.

By the way, when I was at home (school in New York State, home in the Chicago area), I never met another girl who watched Star Trek. Science Fiction was so frowned upon as reading material or watching material for girls, you have no idea. My parents were very upset when they caught me reading my brother’s copies of Asimov, or Clarke. Yeah, I had to hide them under the mattress during the day and read under the covers with a flashlight at night. Even at college, it was rare for me to find another girl who liked science fiction.

Respect your fandom foremothers.

THIS IS FUCKING CUUUUUTE

1 month ago  +  6,195 notes  ( source, via )
tagged as:  #amazing  #star trek  #fandom  #who run the world